Adobe flash player update (20160407)

Adobe released another out-of-band update to flash player yesterday. They categorize this as a critical vulnerability. Here’s the security bulletin.

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2016-03-11 emergency flash player update from Adobe

Adobe has released an update for flash player (here’s the security bulletin). Like Microsoft, Adobe usually release updates on the second Tuesday of the month (and they both did that earlier this week), but this update addresses serious problems in flash player, one of which is being actively exploited.

This is sometimes called an out-of-band update, because they’re releasing it off their normal schedule. That sometimes highlights the importance of the update.

So. Update your flash player.

Default passwords

A network router is a device which forwards traffic between two networks. Your computer is on one segment of the internet, and your favorite web site is (likely) on a different segment. There’s at least one network router between you and your favorite web site moving the data packets back and forth.

Routers will typically more-or-less work right out of the box, but they generally need some configuration to do their jobs well (and securely). Routers frequently offer a web interface for this: you connect a computer to the router, go to a particular web address (specified by the product’s documentation), and then configure the device for its particular purpose. For example, if you’re setting up a router for an elementary school, you might configure the router to send all web traffic through some kind of content filter.

More and more devices are like this: you buy a shiny new gizmo, connect it to your network, and it offers some feature you can control with an app on your phone. This is the “Internet of Things” (IoT):

Network-enabled security cameras are another interesting example of this kind of thing. Imagine being able to log on to a camera hundreds of miles away, have it take pictures on demand, and view the images.

These devices typically ship with a default password. And that’s the big problem with these things: they don’t necessarily force you to change the password, and those default passwords are well documented and widely available: they’re in the product documentation that the manufacturer probably puts on their web site for anyone to download.

(Sometimes the manufacturer will try to assign a unique default password to every unit they sell. This is great when they do it right, but sometimes they fail hilariously.)

Shodan and Censys are projects which portscan the internet and make the data available to anyone who wants to look at it. This data often reveals the manufacturer and model number of internet routers. Netgear devices often give the full model number in the remote administration password prompt. And there are web sites (like routerpasswords.com) devoted to making it easy to look up the default password for a particular network device model.

There are two important points to remember here:

  1. If you are writing about a character who wants to compromise a network target, and if she can determine the manufacturer and/or model number of the router protecting her target (either through shodan or by portscanning it herself), she can look up the default password either through something like routerpasswords.com or by downloading product documentation from the manufacturer. If the network pukes at the target haven’t secured their router, your character could add routing table rules allowing her direct access to resources on the internal network.
  2. If you haven’t changed the password on the home router that may be sitting on your desk, now would be a good time to do so. (And unless you REALLY need it, you should disable the remote administration feature which was probably enabled by default.)

2015-12-28 Adobe updates

Adobe has released updates to Adobe Flash Player. This update addresses critical security problems. If you you have Flash Player installed on your computer (which is likely), please update it.

Looks like if you let Firefox and Google Chrome update themselves, that may be enough to update Flash Player in those browsers. Otherwise, the Adobe Flash Player page can tell you if you need an update (you may want to visit this page in each web browser you use).

For more technical information, see the Adobe security bulletin.

This bulletin also includes an update for Adobe AIR. If you think AIR is installed on your computer, here’s the Adobe AIR page.

Statement of purpose

For years I’ve had a ridiculous fantasy of being a fiction writer. It seems that the best-selling novel I want to have written isn’t going to write itself. I’m having trouble getting motivated, so maybe what I need is another distraction: a blog.

I thought that technology in writing might be an interesting theme. Nothing ruins a story for me faster than a character hacking the FBI network after tapping on a keyboard for ten seconds. It probably works for many readers/viewers, but some of us see it as lazy writing.

In my day job I write lots of web applications for a public university. Many of my assignments are to convert paper processes into online forms. My job also involves a fair bit of Linux server administration. Most of this goes on the open Internet and is subject to daily cyber-attacks from all over the world (my server logs once revealed malicious traffic from Antarctica).

So the purpose of this blog has a couple of goals. One is to get me in the habit of writing. But I thought it might be useful to share some of what I’ve learned in a format that may be helpful to other prospective writers. I may also write about how technology can affect a writer. Here are some topics I have in mind:

  • credible hacking
    • port scanning
    • realistic exploitable security vulnerabilities
    • case studies of actual security breaches (like Target)
  • a writer’s technology
    • safe(r) Internet use (account security, security-related Firefox extensions, password managers)
    • affordable and effective backups
    • writing tools like scrivener and wordpress (I know a fair bit about the latter and would like to learn more about the former)
  • the day-to-day life of a web programmer
    • server administration is not sexy
    • the importance (and challenge) of making web sites accessible
    • the horrors of working with vendors and ticketing systems

This blog may at times earn a PG-13 rating. I’ll mostly keep it clean, but there may be the occasional bit of salty language.

I’ll try to post every seven to fourteen days (historically I’ve really struggled with self-imposed routines like that), and I’ll try to keep individual posts fairly short (preferring to break up longer topics into multiple posts).